Rising from the Shadows: The Affordability of Shale

 

 

It’s official. Consumers are reaping the benefits of fracking. In Pennsylvania, one of the first places to see a hydraulic fracturing (fracking) boom, utility companies have been lowering their gas prices and consumers are starting to notice the savings: lower utility bills. Pretty nice holiday gift. Soon, everyone’s going to want in. Who doesn’t want cheaper utility bills? A heyday for the oil and gas industry is just on the horizon.

 

According to an article by Andrew Maykuth of the Philly Inquirer, “The five big regional utilities that serve Pennsylvania and New Jersey customers have reduced their prices on the gas portion of bills by amounts ranging from 37 percent to 52 percent since Dec. 1, 2008, reflecting the steady fall in market prices that experts attribute to new supplies of shale gas.”

 

http://articles.philly.com/2011-12-23/news/30551359_1_shale-gas-gas-portion-gas-

 

Maybe there’s a shale deposit in GA that energy companies just haven’t found. The Atlanta native in me can only hope. But the chief benefit of fracking doesn’t get much clearer than lower utility bills. Bills cut in half.

 

Yet the momentous savings isn’t enough for some people.

 

The environmentalists.

 

After all the oil and gas companies have overcome by the EPA, they still have a battle to continue. The EPA doesn’t want to let up. And by the amount of contentious attacks the environmentalists are using—still—against fracking, the savings in utility bills may be short-lived.

 

The “Greens” as some call them find a way to destroy this good news with less-than-accurate claims against this prosperous natural gas revolution. Like the Wyoming report I mentioned a couple of days ago that was scrutinized by in a Wall Street Journal article titled “The EPA’s Fracking Scare.”

 

At what point will the EPA back off?

 

Maybe they will never stop their raid. But what we will see in light of this Shale Revolution, even if they are only small glimpses, is a rise in public praise for fracking from reduced utility bills, instead of contemptible images of contaminated water touted by the EPA.

 

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